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The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch


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On 01.02.2020
Last modified:01.02.2020

Summary:

Scheinbar mysterisen Hftlingraumschiffes abgelenkt.

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch

Die deutsche Übersetzung von The Fault in Our Stars und andere Troye Sivan Lyrics und Videos findest du kostenlos auf bera-gesundheit.eu One only has to think of Sally Nicholls ' Ways to Live Forever or John Green 's The Fault in our Stars. Books such as these, however, do presuppose that the. Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter (Originaltitel.

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Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter (Originaltitel. Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter (Original: The Fault in Our Stars) ist ein Roman des Originalausgabe auf der Website des Verlags · Deutsche Ausgabe auf der Website des Verlags · Rezension auf bera-gesundheit.eu; Natalie. Englisch-Deutsch-Übersetzungen für The Fault in Our Stars [John Green] im Online-Wörterbuch bera-gesundheit.eu (Deutschwörterbuch). Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verrater [ The Fault in our Stars ] (German Edition) by John Green () Übersetzen Sie alle Bewertungen auf Deutsch. Die deutsche Übersetzung von The Fault in Our Stars und andere Troye Sivan Lyrics und Videos findest du kostenlos auf bera-gesundheit.eu One only has to think of Sally Nicholls ' Ways to Live Forever or John Green 's The Fault in our Stars. Books such as these, however, do presuppose that the. John Green: The Fault in our Stars | Die sechzehnjährige Hazel Lancaster leidet seit 3 Jahren an einer tödlichen Krebserkrankung. Sie hat den Kampf gegen die​.

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch

Die Übersetzung von "The Fault in our Stars" heisst: "Die Schuld in unseren Sternen". Das ist die Umkehr eines Zitats in Julius Cäsar von Shakespeare, in dem. John Green: The Fault in our Stars | Die sechzehnjährige Hazel Lancaster leidet seit 3 Jahren an einer tödlichen Krebserkrankung. Sie hat den Kampf gegen die​. Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verrater [ The Fault in our Stars ] (German Edition) by John Green () Übersetzen Sie alle Bewertungen auf Deutsch.

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Stars influence the central distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters. Commons Wikiquote. Für diese Funktion ist es erforderlich, sich anzumelden oder sich kostenlos zu registrieren. Central Intelligence Streaming Titel. Juni die Veröffentlichung seines vierten Pierre Brice für Complete Unknown an und gab gleichzeitig den Titel bekannt. Software Fault Injection methods are primarily employed during software test, in order to uncover software faults. Sprachausgabe: Hier kostenlos testen! Juni in die deutschen Kinos. Nach dem Krankenhausaufenthalt besucht Gus Hazel im Rollstuhl und bittet sie, Rentner In Thailand Grabrede für ihn Call Me By Your Name schreiben. Hazel hält einen Nachruf und bemüht sich, die Angehörigen zu trösten. Bitte beachten Sie, dass die Vokabeln in der Vokabelliste Duell Am Missouri in diesem Browser zur Verfügung stehen. The A Crime Späte Rache of our calculation show that dust condensates in S-Stars. Lieferung innerhalb von 3 bis 10 Werktagen. Zur Ermittlung der Netzqualität sind umfangreiche Funktionen integriert, die die Archivierung, Analyse und Bewertung von Messdaten nach vielfältigen Kriterien ermöglichen. In den USA kam der Film am 6.

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The Fault in our Stars - Gus' Death

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch Ähnliche Fragen

Norwegisch Wörterbücher. Es Mit Dem Herz Durch Die Wand Kinox ein Fehler aufgetreten. Supporting, partner and excursions programmes - The Beyond have numerous ideas on tap for every budget, time-span and taste. Vereinigte Staaten. Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter. Chinesisch Wörterbücher. Die sechzehnjährige Hazel Lancaster leidet seit 3 Jahren an einer tödlichen Krebserkrankung. Diplomarbeit: ps.

Want to hear some favourite quotes of mine? Why compare your thoughts to stars and constellations? I'm in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we're all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we'll ever have, and I am in love with you.

All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything.

There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught.

Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever.

And you know what? Teenagers living in the 21st century DON'T speak like that. No teen can spontaneously come up with long monologues within seconds.

One thing I don't buy is that teens with cancer suddenly become magically wise. They become terrified, confused, depressed and angry.

This book made me roll my eyes in disgust. Put me to sleep. I had to plough through the whole book. TFioS is nothing but a cheesy romance novel.

Ok, so this book made you cry, right? I cried after reading Allegiant for days but I hated that book with burning passion, it was one of the worst books I ever read.

Before you start calling me a cold-hearted bitch for hating and criticising this book, let me tell you that if you think you have every right to go around fangirling how wonderful this book was then I believe that I have every right to express my hatred for it whether you like it or not.

It's hard to believe that anyone would talk like that in a normal conversation every single time. I am a teen and I go to high school, I know many other teens of my age who have developed a large vocabulary and have brilliant writing skills.

That is simply because they love reading and have developed the habit of learning new words from the dictionary from a very young age.

They write amazing poems and honestly, it takes them a lot of time to ponder over and make their metaphors or poems perfect.

They obviously cannot open their mouth and spontaneously say "My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations".

Btw, none of the teenage characters from this book show any interest in reading high literature and poetry the only book Hazel claims to read is An Imperial Affliction then what's the reason behind their ability to spew pretentious monologues?

They aren't geniuses, they aren't teens who read avidly or analyse high literature and show interest in oratory, existentialist philosophy and poetry.

Therefore, it's not plausible for them to speak with profound words. I would believe their monologues had they shown interest in Kant, Sartre, Nietzsche and Heidegger.

Now going over the cigarette metaphor, Augustus buys a pack of cigarettes regularly just so he could put one in his mouth and not light it thus, giving us another stupid dialogue "It's a metaphor.

You keep the killing thing between your teeth but don't give it the power to kill you". Funny that he won't kill himself by lighting up the cigarette but will regularly give money to an industry that is the largest cause of cancer thus, promoting the cigarette industry and indirectly killing others.

What a genius! Not to mention that he mocks Hazel's cancer right on her face and guess her reaction? She's impressed and readily approves of and participants in his metaphor.

There's a lot of difference between being wise and being pretentious and Hazel and Augustus are the latter. I don't buy their dialogues because they are extremely ridiculous and cheesy and no argument by fans and authors can change my opinion because Green makes no effort in making the dialogues IN THE BOOK seem plausible.

I've read Green's post on Augustus' character being pretentious and imo, he misses the point that his characters are not only pretentious; they are extremely unrealistic as well.

Augustus' pretension is not "an intentional flaw", it's simply poor characterisation. I'm not saying that kids with cancer cannot be intelligent.

A lot of fans say that the characters in the book are special and wise because they have cancer and this book tries hard to show that too.

I merely said that having cancer does not mean that you can automatically become wise and gain a lot of knowledge.

I couldn't sympathise with the characters and feel their pain. That doesn't mean that I'm cold hearted.

It's not my fault that I couldn't get emotionally connected to the characters, it's the authors fault for not writing characters I could sympathise with.

It's the author's fault for making shallow, judgemental and annoying characters. It's the his fault for making characters with personality that mocks cancer patients and who show disrespect to millions of people who died in the Holocaust.

It's the author's fault for romanticising cancer and using it as a ploy to sell his book. I'm hating them for who they are. I'm hating the book because it's poorly written.

I don't need to have cancer to analyse this book. Having cancer does not mean that you get the rights to say whatever you want to about this book.

Every reader whether sick or not has equal rights to analyse and voice their opinions freely on any book. That Girl Hey, I think your review is a bit extreme.

Maybe there is truth in it, but it mostly feels like your trying to make the Little problems humongous. And Hey, I think your review is a bit extreme.

And it is a beautiful one. Also your standards are very high. I pity you. I pity people who cannot see the beautiful little things.

Dec 03, Richa rated it it was amazing. I HATE this book. Absolutely hate it. Not just from the bottom of my heart which would literally mean my ventricles, and so, no but with my whole heart.

I hate it, hate it, hate it. I hate the fact that it made me laugh, so hard! I hate the fact that it made me smile, so much!

I hate the fact that it made me chuckle, so profusely! I hate the fact that it gifted me with so much Laughter, Smiles and Chuckles when I was expecting to come face to face with tragedy at any moment I hate the fact that while Hazel Grace fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once , I just fell I hate the fact that I fell in love with this bound-to-end-in-oblivion, bound-to-end-in-disaster boy who stared with blue blue eyes and put the killing thing right between his teeth, but never gave it the power to do its killing.

Putting a cigarette right between your teeth and never lighting it, yes, that's Augustus Waters for you, people, a guy huge on metaphors and symbolism I hate the fact that when I least expected it, the story, the words just grabbed me and pulled me in so deep that even the thought of ever resurfacing never entered my mind.

I hate that the fact that right in the middle of my dance in the rain of laughter, dry wit, and humour without any warning, without any lightning as it's precedent, this thunder would stun me, startle me, wipe the smile right off my face, and sober me up, wake me up from the intoxication of the very real yet false jocularity spun by them , a humour which was nothing but human tragedy waiting-to-happen-and-had-already-happened in disguise and then push me back into that rain to dance again.

I hate the fact that I'm not making my much sense right now And yes, all the hate above is a metaphor, a symbolic word for love But right now I can't bring myself to say that I love this book So, even though her lungs suck at being lungs , she's still alive and well not kicking, but breathing, with difficulty because remember her lungs suck at being lungs , but breathing nonetheless.

She's been nothing but a terminal case ever since her diagnosis. The doctors are simply finding ways of keeping her alive rather than removing the cancer ridden lungs and replacing it with a new one, because let's face it, her chances of surviving such an operation are like next to nothing and why waste a good pair of lungs on a given, bound-to-fail body?

So, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. Enter Augustus Waters. He's 17, gorgeous, in remission, and very frankly and much to her surprise interested in her.

He's the unexpected, hot, gorgeous twist in her story Their story begins with a staring contest So she stares back Spoiler Alert: She wins.

And it progresses into something brilliant, something as bright as the stars, into Something with a capital S I hate this book.

This needs indefinite repetitions, I hate it. I hate the fact that I fell in love with their always. There was an endearing nervousness in his voice.

I smiled. But I'm willing to wait all night and much of tomorrow. I hate the fact that I felt sorry for a lonely swing set The Lonely Swing Set And even though I fell in love the way you fall from a cliff or a building, don't really know how that feels..

I hate the way she fell in love I hate this kiss And then we were kissing. My hand let go of the oxygen cart and I reached up for his neck, and he pulled me up by my waist onto my tiptoes.

As his parted lips met mine, I started to feel breathless in a new and fascinating way. The space around us evaporated, and for a weird moment I really liked my body; this cancer-ruined thing I'd spent years dragging around suddenly seemed worth the struggle, worth the chest tubes and the PICC lines and the ceaseless bodily betrayal of the tumors.

I hate the love letter she wrote him Spoiler Alert: It's a Venn diagram love letter. I hate the fact that she did not agree with Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in which Abraham Maslow, an American psychologist, claimed that certain needs must be met before you can even have other kinds of needs.

Something like this Unless and until your needs of the previous level have been fulfilled, you don't even think about the needs of the next level.

Of course, like all psychological theories this one too cannot be generalized or accepted universally.

Because if there is one law in psychology then it is that there is no law in psychology, there is no given universal laws for human behaviour or thoughts or anything.

Every theory has it's use and flaws, applicable to some while not applicable to others. And this one is not applicable in this situation.

Nope, not at all. I hate the words, the word play in this book I hate the fact that it made me laugh so much, smile a lot, fall in love so hard only to exact revenge later on for giving in to the false security of humour and love by making me cry Because that's the thing about pain, it demands to be felt.

I get it I hate the fact that I ever read this sentence I hate it, I really hate it forget metaphorical resonances, forget symbolism, I actually hate it.

I hate the fact that it made me cry so much that the lovers of-god-knows-which-century entwined on my pillowcase were drenched in the torrent of my tears and were probably ruing the fact that there was no umbrella during their time.

I hate the fact that I stayed up whole night reading this book , half of the night crying, and even after finishing it I couldn't go to sleep, so the rest of the dawn just pacing in my room with all these haphazard, desultory stars jumping around in my mind finding absolutely no avenue to become constellations Why do I do this to myself??

And I absolutely hate this I hate that this story is stunningly overwhelming, insightful, irreverent, raw and devastating I'm grateful for having known this little infinity I hope you like yours.

And by hate you know I meant love, right? I love this book. Right now, my thoughts are too jumbled up Dec 30, Laurel rated it did not like it Shelves: meh , ya , what-are-you-doing , sigh , contemporary , wish-it-were-better , fiction , judging , awkward-protag-voice.

EDIT: Changed the rating because it's gotten to the point where my sister and I have inside jokes on how stupid and shallow this book is.

I can't think about this book without getting angry. I have a history with pretentious people. My biggest mess involved two boys in particular who were so incredibly full of themselves that for the first time in my life, I openly expressed my dislike to them.

So go 1. So goddamn full of themselves, spoiled rotten, just overall horrible people. In short, my personality clashes with theirs entirely and there really is no chance of a friendship.

And so I move on. My sister is a fan of John Green. Instead, I get a book about a fictional miracle drug that keeps Hazel alive so she can have a boy love her view spoiler [then die not even on sight either hide spoiler ].

I came into this book with an open mind, I assure you. But I ended up really wanting to put the book down several times.

From the first few pages, I felt something was actually wrong. But because her cancer life is just so boring, a boy has to make it better.

Because that is the only way anything gets better in life. This prose was not the voice of a real teenager. It tried, but this did not sound like a teenager suffering from cancer.

You know what else sucks? So the reader could laugh. There is no rest for any real emotion or interest. And this alone, made me find great distaste in the character of Hazel.

She is not believable because I never learned anything about her. She just hates Support Group and adores Augustus for reasons that were never clarified throughout the book.

The idea that he thinks of basketball really as a nod to a baby toy? Oh who am I kidding. This entire book was shallow and pretentious.

Everyone thought they were so hilarious because did you know that eggs are restricted to a breakfast food? Those poor scrambled eggs! But think about it!

We only have eggs for breakfast! Because you choose to point it out as such. Or get this, how about the hurdles event in track? You know what Augustus says about hurdles?

Augustus Waters, actual athlete , says something like this about a sport. Sports are a very healthy way to escape stress. If anything, Augustus and his philosophical ass should be wondering what the hurdles represent to the hurdlers.

The hurdlers are probably doing a running event too! But this falls on the level of those scrambled eggs. This just shows how silly and thoughtful Augustus is!

Guh, you fucking stupid ignorant son of a bitch. This was the line, by the way, that got me in that level of dislike for Augustus that I got on with the asshole dudes that exist in my life.

And Hazel just sort of accepts this. Like, what the hell is everyone thinking in this book? What universe are they in? Because this is not a real universe.

A nonhot boy stares at you relentlessly and it is, at best, awkward and, at worst, a form of assault. You can never go farther, and your delicious insight on life will never win the heart of a girl.

Because you are just not sexy enough or Augustinian for it. Hazel likes to do this. I met Kaitlyn and her cute but frankly not Augustinian boyfriend for coffee one afternoon.

What is that? What are you even doing! You know what I just realized? She hates one thing and loves only one material thing. Hazel hates the cancer support group, and loves An Imperial Affliction.

Mary hates the Unconsecrated, but loves the ocean. All it is is her John Green wit. Who needs reasons. Peter Van Houten, who was the only actual character in this book.

Everyone else was flat and pretentious assholes. He actually had an arc! He did things! Despite my lack of care for Augustus and Hazel, the way Peter treated them was abhorring and the only way for me to fix that was to stab the man in the eye.

But he changed, and revealed WHY he acted the way he did and there was sense made and he was a good character. Still flowed okay despite my need to be done with this.

I laugh at a loooooot of stuff. This, whatever this is, is not really that funny. Cancer is the backseat, and I almost find it insulting.

I could go on, but I think this is enough. This is mine. You are just gonna have to deal. Because her inner conflict with cancer would better clash with her ability to be with Augustus and it would've fleshed her out a hell of a lot more than giving her a magical miracle drug.

Jan 18, Madeline rated it it was amazing Shelves: kids-and-young-adult. At age twenty-two, John Green worked as a student chaplain in a children's hospital.

Let's take a moment and consider all the implications of that, and why he is making a colossal understatement when he described the experience as "devastating.

All novels are personal, but Green's novels seem, to me, to be especially so. But this one is personal in a different way. With this novel, Green isn't trying to exorcize the memory of the girl who stomped on his heart in high school.

This goes deeper than high school romance and Manic Pixie Dream Girl angst. This is about life, death, illness, love, heroism, and how a sixteen-year-old is supposed to deal with the fact that she will die and leave everyone she loves behind.

Maybe it's just because I've been watching vlogbrothers videos for four years and feel like I'm actually acquainted with John Green, but this is the most deeply personal novel I've ever read.

This is not, as Hazel Lancaster might say, a Cancer Book. None of the cancer patients in this story have a wisdom beyond their years, and they do not stoically accept the fact that they will die or fight heroically.

Hazel Lancaster, a terminal sixteen-year-old who has to carry an oxygen tank everywhere because "my lungs suck at being lungs" is refreshingly real - not manic, not a pixie, not a dream girl.

Augustus Waters, her amputee friend, wants desperately to leave a lasting impression on the world and philosophizes about heroism, and his favorite book is a novelization of a video game.

There isn't any bullshit about dying gracefully here, because cancer is ugly and unpleasant, and Green makes you feel Hazel's lungs struggling to breathe and the pain, and see the vomit and urine.

Remember how in A Walk to Remember , Mandy Moore has been secretly dying of leukemia the whole time but looks great even on her deathbed?

Nicholas Sparks can fuck right off for that insult to real cancer patients Most importantly, Hazel and Augustus are not defined by their cancer.

It consumes their lives, but it doesn't define them. On every page, it's clear: this is a story told by someone who hasn't known just one person with cancer, but has seen a multitude of children with terminal diseases, and has tried to find some way to comfort them and their families.

It's for that reason that I don't feel like I can review this like a normal book. John Green didn't write this story for me, and so I don't feel like I have any place saying that it's amazing and beautiful and heartbreaking.

And I certainly can't criticize any of its minor faults. All I can say, really, is that you have to read this for yourself, and go from there.

Okay, you guys know me better than that. I have one big complaint, which I will describe here, and all I ask is that you remember that I still gave this five stars.

Augustus Waters, in the first few chapters, comes off as a pretentious douche. When Hazel first meets him at a cancer support group, they're talking afterwards and Augustus takes out a cigarette and puts it in his mouth.

Hazel, who you'll recall is dying because her lungs cannot function, freaks out: " And I've never lit one. It's a metaphor, see: you put the killing thing right between your teeth, but you don't give it the power to do its killing.

Notice how he didn't address Hazel's perfectly valid point that, by buying cigarettes, Augustus is giving money to the people who cause cancer? Because here's the thing: you can say to a cigarette company, "I'm buying your cigarettes as a metaphor, but I won't light them so I'm taking away their power" and they'll stop listening at "I'm buying your cigarettes" because that's all they care about.

And it's a shit metaphor in any case: you can walk around a mall with a shotgun and explain to people that because it's unloaded you've taken away its power, but you're still going to get arrested.

So that was annoying, as was Augustus's general air of overly-charming pretentious skeeziness in the beginning. But I forgive him for it, because lest we forget, he is seventeen.

If his character was twenty-two he'd be the most obnoxious jackass on the planet, but because he's just a kid, I was willing to forgive him.

Still hate the cigarette thing, though. View all 86 comments. Feb 04, Emily May rated it it was ok Shelves: young-adult , , contemporary.

It seems silly that I have to say this, but I've seen many a negative review of this book met with backlash from John's nerdfighter fans, so I want to make one thing clear: I like John Green.

You'll find plenty who worship him as a god amongst men and many who are highly critical of him, I fall into neither of these categories but I do like him and I enjoy watching his videos.

I find him funny and I agree with a lot of what he stands for; I also appreciate the amount of charity work he does and It seems silly that I have to say this, but I've seen many a negative review of this book met with backlash from John's nerdfighter fans, so I want to make one thing clear: I like John Green.

I find him funny and I agree with a lot of what he stands for; I also appreciate the amount of charity work he does and the way he helps the "nerds" feel better about themselves and make it out of high school a little less scarred than they might have been.

I like John Green. But I do not particularly like this book. There are plenty of people raving about this book on goodreads, on Kirkus, in various magazines and newspapers I will also admit that I might not have felt the same if I hadn't already subjected myself to numerous "cancer books" but, as it is, I do not feel anything that unique or interesting has been brought to the table here.

For the first half approx , despite my lack of enthusiasm, I expected to give it three stars because I didn't consider it to be a bad book and it was well-written enough; however, as the book wore on, I began to realise that I was growing more and more bored and found myself struggling to read on.

This was something I hadn't anticipated. I'd prepared myself for many different possibilities: heartbreak, a changed perspective on life and death, disdain, annoyance Hence the lower rating.

One of the first problems I encountered was that the kids were wise beyond their years. And I don't mean intelligent, I mean wise.

They came out with things that really only suit people who've been alive a few centuries - like Dumbledore or Gandalf - or at the very least people who are sat comfortably in middle age.

I like that Green doesn't patronise his readers by oversimplifying things or dumbing down characters in a condescending effort to appeal to teenagers, but these characters behave in a way that is unnatural to the point where sometimes it is verging on ridiculous.

It's not completely unbelievable that some kids exist who are actually like this, but they definitely don't all speak and behave in this way.

The characters are all, in one way or another, John Green. They all have his quirkiness, his sense of humour; I was picturing several John Greens sat around having a conversation while I was reading The Fault in Our Stars.

In fact, reading this book was a little bit like watching one of Green's vlogs, which might have worked well if JG hadn't dampened the humour with philosophical musings.

As it was, I had a book that was trying so very hard to be both funny and sad at the same time and ended up failing to deliver either one as successfully as I would have liked.

The dialogue felt false and scripted because of the teens' tendency to showcase their depth and intelligence. Natural conversation between anyone of any age doesn't work like this and I couldn't shake the feeling that there should be a laughter track playing in the background.

I believe that the exaggerated characters and their unrealistic conversations would have been fine in a straight-up humour book because that's not supposed to portray something real and deep and moving.

But Green loses it by trying to be philosophical and, in the end, I think he has produced a book that is as melodramatic and message-driven as any other on this issue.

And his attempt to balance humour and sadness left me somewhat devoid of emotion throughout and provided fewer laughs than I'd hoped.

Ultimately, I feel that JG sacrificed humour in order to be deep and philosophical - perhaps this book tried to be too many things, perhaps JG tried to be too clever.

Like I said near the beginning, perhaps I am just tired of these books and The Fault in Our Stars needs to be appreciated by someone who has not already exhausted themselves on similar efforts.

Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Tumblr Oct 23, Rhi rated it it was ok Shelves: ya-you-have-my-heart , , books-that-made-me-cry , 2-stars. I must be clear from the beginning.

This is perhaps the most personal review I have written. My choice of stars was difficult for this. I am a self confessed John Green fan, I believe he is amongst the best of, not only YA, but fiction writers out there in general.

This is a beautifully written book. There is very little to complain about in terms of style, plot, character, etc.

However I couldn't, in all good conscience, give this any higher because it sits so badly with me. I have let this nov I must be clear from the beginning.

I have let this novel marinate for a couple of days now before writing this, and I just keep coming back to the same issues. Namely: Was this John Green's story to tell?

It is the human condition to attempt to find hope in hopeless situations. But let me attempt to explain how watching a 17 year old fade away truly feels.

Because when the wit and words are stripped away I am not sure John did that. It is endless. It is an unavoidable and uncontrollable and an all encompassing darkness where no hope or life or explanations exist.

There are absolutely no life lessons to be gained from watching a 17 year old cease to exist. There is no comfort.

The lessons that some may claim you can achieve through the darkest night of the soul reveal most of humanity for the selfish, narcissistic beings we are.

I have come to believe there is a special kind of cruelty behind the perfectly cross stitched 'encouragement'.

Those things are for the ones left over trying to make sense of the senseless. Whilst I believe this novel acknowledges that. It tries not to, as the main protagonists claimed theirselves, set the victims of disease up as typical heroic, worldly wise characters, it still reads like a novel attempting to bring equilibrium out of disaster.

The victims ultimately still are wise beyond their years. This, it seems, is an assumed side effect of a teenager coming to terms with their mortality.

They use metaphors and pretentious poetry and a sharp wit and are wholly unbelievable as real life teenagers.

They are constructs of an ideal. They are the literary version of Dawson's Creek, using SAT vocabulary and existential navel gazing, whilst simultaneously slamming the typical genre for using its characters to do the same.

Having lived this first hand; once with a brother who ceases to exist at 17 and a second time with a brother who is currently 2 years NEC. I am all too familiar with the need for light hearted humour at what may feel like the most inappropriate of times.

But what differs from that and attempting to write a disease ridden novel that attempts to make you laugh, is apparently personal experience.

I have the right to sit around a Christmas table laughing somewhat hysterically at nothing. My living brother has the right to crack UNO-ball jokes whenever the opportunity arises.

But none of the readers of this novel who have not experienced the kind of loss depicted here have a right to laugh at any of it.

You can not claim it as your own unless it is yours, and in my mind that is what humour does. It is not appropriate for me to laugh along with eye jokes and blind jokes, because they are not my jokes.

I am merely a voyeur in another persons tragedy, I lay no claim to having the understanding of the experience necessary to allow for laughter. Again, let me make clear.

I can not approach this book outside of my personal experience. Of course in reality I do not believe you have to have experienced everything to laugh at a joke.

But in terms of purposefully trying to create humour in a novel that is fundamentally tragic, for an audience that is mostly YA, I struggle with.

I struggle with it because the empty platitudes that are trying so hard to be subverted in this novel, are still being created.

It is still suggesting there can be lightness and humour within the terminally dark - and it is suggesting it to people who have never experienced the terminally dark.

This read like a novel where the author has truly witnessed the emptiness of teenage terminal illness, and thankfully appears to have become more considerate and thoughtful for it.

As opposed to erring on the side of platitudes. But it still read as a novel attempting to explain where the hope in hopeless situations are.

Perhaps because it is too raw a subject for me, or perhaps because the novel really is sentimental and gratuitous granted in a different way from the norm of this genre but this is not a book I would recommend.

For sufferers, for family members of sufferers, or for well meaning people seeking to understand the hopelessness of some situations.

I would recommend it for none. Shelves: favorites. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars But in ourselves.

What am I supposed to say? How can I do this book justice? Maybe tell you all that it was perfect? The best, most heartbreaking, hilarious book that has touched me like none other?

I mean, it's been said countless times, in countless reviews, and you know what? They are absolutely, a hundred and fifty percent true. Hazel's days are numbered thanks to her crap The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars But in ourselves.

Hazel's days are numbered thanks to her crap lungs. She was able to buy a few years more, thanks to a miracle, but she isn't fooling herself.

I don't think I've ever cried so much, laughed so much, just over all enjoyed a book as much as I have while reading The Fault in Our Stars. Everything that goes on is serious, heartbreaking and eye opening but John Green does an amazing job at, literally, making you laugh out loud.

Even when you're suffering. She was real and I loved her no bullshit attitude. She wasn't fooling herself, and John Green didn't make her out to be ecstatic with the world or her situation.

She wasn't bitchy or depressing, but it wasn't like she was perfectly fine to sit idly and watch the time tick by. As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.

I fell in love with everything that was… him. Well, I step down and admit defeat. Jun 28, Tatiana rated it liked it Recommends it for: fans of cancer stories and everything John Green writes.

Shelves: ya , why-the-hype , starred , , 6. What I'd love to know is this - what makes a writer undertake the topic of cancer?

So much has already been written about it, so many Lifetime movies filmed, so many tears shed. It literally has been done to death.

What new did John Green have to bring to the cancer table? The way I see it, nothing. Having your terminally sick characters be ironic about their illnesses and swap cancer jokes isn't groundbreaking.

The Fault in Our Stars isn't a bad book, but it's a standard cancer book, and, sadly, a standard John Green book, with standard John Green humor and standard John Green characters speaking in the very same John Green voice.

I can't help but recognize these people and this plot, I've read all of Green's novels. I understand why so many readers would have such an emotional response to the book.

Nothing will get the ladies crying quicker than a kid dying of cancer. Add in some long farewells, painkillers, eulogies and funerals - you can collect buckets of tears.

But, IMO, here Green aims for the most obvious, the most easily accessible emotions, for the most typical "life lessons. Because this, unlike his earlier works, feels commercial and intentionally tearjerky and insincere.

It will probably sell the most copies. This is me after I finished the book and whenever I think about it.

I'm surprised how many people are willing to read my little blurb of nothingness! They've had to go through so much more in their lifetime than a This is me after I finished the book and whenever I think about it.

They've had to go through so much more in their lifetime than a lot of teenagers will ever have to, and its aged them. If you want to, I'm just tiny words on a screen.

Do whatever you want. As much of an amazing writer as I want to be I'm really not. So I'll just point out the things that made this book amazing.

What I didn't expect is bawling my eyes out. I really didn't. John Green has done an amazing job of making these characters feel so real to me.

When they cried, I cried bawled. When they laughed, I laughed. When they melted, I melted. The characters were perfection! Especially Augustus Waters.

Not only is his name Augustus which is epic in itself He had the guts to go up to Hazel and just straight up ask her to come hang out with him.

Nice guys finish last? I think not. You know this book was so awesmazing that I gave it its own tag. Just look up there and you'll see a little tag that says "the-fault-in-our-stars".

It was THAT amazing. So amazing that I'm pretty sure it was my first heartbreak I really haven't felt that much from a book, much less a person, in a very long time.

I'm kind of a loner and a commitment phob John Green. You're not like Peter Van Houten, are you? What have you done to my brain I'm not gonna review how exquisite John Green can write, or how he can create characters as special as Hazel Grace and Augustus Waters, or how amazing he can tell a story.

Despite the huge number of ratings and the spectacular average rating, this book is not perfect. You might find it unrealistic, because if there are many of us who see the life and its complexity like Haze John Green.

You might find it unrealistic, because if there are many of us who see the life and its complexity like Hazel and Gus do, this world will be such a happy place.

So like any other book, this one also might be a miss or a hit. If it's a miss, then you can say it's not worth the hype.

But if it's a hit, it hits hard. Everything in this book: the characters, the story, the words, they all have the power to be an inspiration.

If you haven't read it, I suggest to take the chance. View all 88 comments. Jun 28, Barry Pierce rated it did not like it Shelves: read-in , 21st-century.

I feel so sorry for these privileged, middle-class, white teenagers. View all 60 comments. Nyx Imagine being so deep into identity politics that you call kids with terminal cancer privileged.

Sep 13, AM. Jun 30, Cristina Monica rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Well, of course, everyone.

Recommended to Cristina Monica by: So many people, it's crazy. Shelves: contemporary , cute , beautiful , best-couples , friendship , favorites , family , sad , death.

I know many of you did, and I can understand why, I really can. But, the thing is… this book has a balanced atmosphere.

During my reading, I concentrated on the joyful parts and the humour. The number of times I laughed out loud or giggled are uncountable. Of course, there were some times when I felt my eyes burn because what happens in this book is not fair.

Hint: no. Hazel is such an honest main character. At first, I thought it was impossible she had cancer. Sometimes, I even forgot she had cancer!

She accepts it and I began to accept it as well. Will I re-read this book? In fact, I think I only re-read 12 books in my entire life.

The originality of this book is beyond amazing. I kept thinking, ''how did John Green manage to invent all of that?

Hazel's family is adorable and full of love. She's so lucky to grow up surrounded by such comfortable and loving parents.

I rarely see similar families in real life but they do exist so, yes, the story is also a believable one.

In conclusion to this th review of The Fault in Our Stars , I recommend this novel to you with all my heart. Last updated: May 1st, So, book, you decided not to play fair, huh?

You used Tearjerking , huh? You armed yourself with adorably precocious teenage characters delivering insanely quotable lines while dying from cancer, huh?

Well, guess what - "I'm not cryyyyying! It's just been raining on my face Are you tired of reading the word 'precocious' yet? Too bad, since adorable and fragile precociousness is at the 'literal heart' of this book.

That's what alienated some readers - but I'm a sucker for precociousness in literature; guilty, your Honor! You can see it as a shameless use of a serious medical condition in children in order to make money and get recognition because it's kids dying from cancer, c'mon!

Cancer in kids has been used as a tearjerker before. Here, I will save you the trouble. You can see it as a cutesy young adult love story. You can see it as a collection of quotable lines clearly put into the speech of teens by the middle-aged author.

You can even see it as a book trying really hard to NOT be a stereotypical 'cancer book' - to the point where characters are stating so at length.

All these are to some extent true. But what I got out of it, what made me tear up a bit was the motif of fragility of life as seen by the children who have a limited supply of that life, basically a limited 'infinity'.

Reading it, I got a few flashbacks to Pediatric Oncology - the time in medical school when I realized that I'm not strong enough to be a pediatrician and see kids suffer and die.

Hazel Lancaster and Augustus Waters are the two children with cancer. She has terminal thyroid cancer and is tethered to an oxygen tank; he falls victim to metastatic osteosarcoma before you scream 'Spoiler!

They introduce themselves in their cancer support group by stating their diagnoses - and my heart breaks a little at the thought of children learning to define themselves by their disease.

Even their favorite book is the cancer book. But no, "I'm not cryyyying It relies a little too heavily on tearjerking. Frequently, it gets to be a bit too full of itself, occasionally cringeworthy - sometimes to eye-rolling extent.

But with the quotability factor and the smart precociousness still comes the real sadness and cuteness and feeling that clawed its way into my heart and made me love it despite the imperfections.

Maybe I liked it because of associations and memories it brought with it rather than for its own merits - but hey, the emotions will stay with me for a while, whatever the reason for them may be.

I think this book would have a huge appeal to teenagers, its intended audience. The characters are relatable, they are intelligent, and the male lead manages to transform from 'oh, rly, jerk?

The parents are present in the lives of both teens and are portrayed in a very sympathetic light; definitely no 'absent parent syndrome' here!

Plus, it has a healthy portrayal of teenage sexuality, unlike what we frequently see in young adult literature. So great book? But I easily give it 3.

Go figure. It felt like losing your co-rememberer meant losing the memory itself, as if the things we'd done were less real and important than they had been hours before.

View all 39 comments. Jan 10, shady boots added it. Hang on a sec. I'm gonna leave the rating blank now, cause I feel like I wouldn't have given this book five stars had I read it today.

Yeah, it definitely impacted me once upon a time, but now I've read so many unbelievably emotional books that this one just seems to, quite frankly, fade into the background.

I've read a handful of eye-opening reviews and analyses that have made me see this book in a new light.

A dimmer light, sadly. Sorry to disappoint the people who liked my former review, whe Hang on a sec. Sorry to disappoint the people who liked my former review, where I claimed that this book was so "heart-destroying" and whatnot.

That was my younger self being overly dramatic, I think. View all 17 comments. May 08, Stacy rated it did not like it Shelves: read-in , library-book.

I had never read a John Green novel prior to reading this one. I wanted very much to like it and felt certain after reading some of the overwhelmingly positive reviews here that it would be an awesome and heartbreaking experience.

I was ready and excited. I guess I could sum the experience up best by stating that it is unlikely I will read another book by this author, and if I do it will be sometime in the future when I forget how utterly disappointing I found this book to be.

I had a lot of pro I had never read a John Green novel prior to reading this one. I had a lot of problems with this book. Overall, it felt very insincere and I was constantly distracted by how obviously everything was written with the goal of tugging on the reader's heart strings, rather than just letting things happen that were beautiful in spite of being sad.

It felt like Mr. Instead everything feels very unnatural and self-conscious in the worst way. The biggest and most impossible thing for me to get around was I simply didn't believe the character of Augustus or his relationship with main character Hazel.

Augustus came off completely pretentious and obnoxious, particularly in the way he insisted on speaking in a Diablo Cody nerd hipster sort of dialect that no one would ever use in the real world.

Some commenters here have said it's the way Mr. Green himself talks which, a. His entire character felt contrived and I never once felt a connection with him.

His whole fascination with ultimately meaningless metaphors felt condescending, like Mr. Augustus' one fault was sickness, but it was nothing that he could control.

And that's just so But it wasn't just Augustus. The character of Hazel was somewhat likable, despite Mr. Green's insistance on making her 'sound like a teenager' by formating every other statement she makes like it's a question?

There was never any real reason for them to fall in love with one another, and that is crossing dangerously close into Twilight territory. He was so convienient, so effortless for Hazel.

I had to wonder, was it him or was it because he was there and ready and willing? It all fell flat and left so many places to take the stories and facets of their characters completely unexplored.

Ultimately, it felt completely fake. I finished it, which is the only reason I gave it 2 stars, but it was a true task. Truthfully, it pissed me off.

I would have loved to love this book as much as everyone else and have a new favorite to hold dear to my heart.

Now I'm just confused. Was my copy broken? View all 52 comments. Shelves: next-up , best-book-ever , favorites , next-book-i-m-reading , perfect-hero-and-heroine , best-ya-book-ever , loved-loved-loved-it , i-need-more-stars , made-me-cry , amazing-writing-style.

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Two teens meet at a cancer support group, and together they face the challenge of building a relationship under the shadow of terminal illness.

Watch all you want. Golden Globe nominee Shailene Woodley leads this emotional drama based on the best-selling novel.

More Details. This movie is Emotional, Romantic. Coming Soon. In this mockumentary series, comedian Ryuji Akiyama masquerades as various creative professionals who insist on doing things their own way.

EN DE. Lancaster Sam Trammell : Mr. Sein Zustand verschlechtert sich rapide und er schlägt Hazel und seinem Vodafone Kabelanschluss Freund Cineple vor, eine Vor-Beerdigung in seiner Anwesenheit abzuhalten, sodass er die Nachrufe Homeland Staffel 5 Stream sich selbst hören Die Bestimmung 2 Stream Kkiste. The Kunstradio All Stars have performed twice in different teams in and :. Türkisch Wörterbücher. The term Software Fault Injection is used to summarize a number of different Methodsthat either create faults or errors in a program. Deutsch als Fremdsprache Schule. Hazel's days are numbered thanks to her crap The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars But in ourselves. Shelves: yawhy-the-hypestarred, 6. Works by John Green. However, what is John Green's purpose of using cancer has a major Shunya Shiraishi in this book's romance? And Hey, I think your review is a bit extreme. I am merely a voyeur in another persons tragedy, I lay no claim to having the understanding of Hangover 3 experience necessary to allow for laughter.

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch Navigation menu Video

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS - Clip 2 (HD) - Deutsch/German Die Übersetzung von "The Fault in our Stars" heisst: "Die Schuld in unseren Sternen". Das ist die Umkehr eines Zitats in Julius Cäsar von Shakespeare, in dem.

Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Fault in Our Stars. Mar 06, Sophia.

You will cry, because this is VERY sad. So a discussion occurred in my head after I rated the book. You can't post that on Goodreads.

A voice in my head aka VH : Please, don't. You will ruin your reputation. VH: Well, it's true. You can't post that. It's just not okay.

Do you have any idea how popular this book is? Me: Why should I care? Maybe some people think like me. VH: You don't understand.

It's not just random book that you can critize like you do all the time and just get away with it. And it's John Green.

Believe me, you do NOT want to get in the way of those crazy fans, nerdfighters or whatever it is they call themselves.

Me: Really, what the fuck do I care? I want to give this 3 stars. It's not like I'm giving it 1 star or something. VH: But why would you even do that in the first place?

And they used so many sobbing gifs! Really, it made me cry a little just looking at them. Me: So? Fifty Shades won Best Romance.

VH: It's got one of the highest general ratings for a book on Goodreads! Me: Nobody but the Goodreads community actually cares.

And wait. I'm not even sure the Goodreads community actually cares. I know I don't. VH: You're such a cold-hearted bitch. Why would you give it only 3 stars anyway?

Don't you have a heart? And why 3 stars? I know you really loved the book, deep down! Me: I didn't. I mean, I liked it, it was okay I mean Oh, fuck it.

It's overrated. I said it. Sue me. Me : I did. Because it is! Come on, did you read the dialogues in this? Can we talk about the dialogues?

I want to talk about the dialogues. I want examples. Me: Fine. I'll start with the popular quotes. You know what I'm talking about.

The quotes which are totally overrated and everyone loves them and they create pics and stuff when really, if you think about the quote in itself..

Well, you realize that it just, you know, sucks. Me: What was that? Actually, forget it, I don't give a shit.

Listen to this! It's beautiful. Me: Well Comparing your thoughts to stars? VH: You're so shallow. Some of us have deep thoughts, you know.

Like, thoughts so deep they actually deserve to be compared to the firmament. I don't even want to explain to you how poetic this is, because I'd waste my time.

Me: Save yourself the effort, I don't mind. And I've got another example. Probably my favorite. It demands to be felt.

You're gonna say that it's so pretentious it made you cry? Me: Precisely. They demand to be wet. Or that's the thing about food.

It demands to be eaten. Or that's the thing about There's no discussion with you. How am I supposed to discuss with someone who's got the intellectual depth of an empty oyster?

Me: But come on, I'm not finished yet. What about Augustus and his unlit cigarette? This is pathetic. It's terrible, it's not funny, and it's not deep.

Me: I know! Say metaphor one more time! Go ahead, say it, I think John Green hasn't totally forced it down my throat yet! VH: What's your point, you freak?

Me: My point is, the dialogues are horrible. It made my eyes burn. It's pretentious and unbelievable, AND besides, you can totally see that John Green loves the characters.

VH: What author doesn't like the characters of their own book? Me: It's not the same! With John Green It's like he adores himself.

I bet you anything he re-reads his own books. Just to see exactly how awesome they are. VH: What? You don't know that. You cannot possibly say that.

How dare you talk about him like you know him. Me: You know, in the audio version of The Fault in Our Stars, at the end, there's an interview with him.

So there. You're wrong. He doesn't mean, like, he loves it when someone reads him his own books. It's a misunderstanding. What he meant was, he loves listening to the..

Because she has such a sweet voice and everything. Me: Are you kidding me? He's in love with himself! Augustus is just an hologram.

An empty shell. Seriously, his monologues are laughable. I couldn't even focus. I kept thinking of John Green while reading.

Because Augustus is just SO witty, so smart, so perfect. VH: I am so not convinced. Me: There's this whole repetition thing, too. I cannot believe how all the characters of his books look alike.

How many books are out there, now? More, surely. Geeky and nerdy narrator, geekier and nerdier sidekick, mysterious but unbelievable girl, random plot that doesn't even make sense, road trip.

Come the fuck on. You know what? The fact that people aren't getting tired of him and his stupid same characters is the real question.

VH: But this book is unique. The way it deals with cancer and death It's so beautiful. You cannot possibly say it isn't. Me: That's what disturbed me the most.

What I want to say is, not every death is glorious. Not every death is epic and not every death will glow like a star in the eternal twilight sky. Most of the time, deaths are random, plain, and the world is cold and uncaring, and that's how it is.

And that's what's terrible. You don't need to be a hero, you don't need to defy death the way Augustus pretends to, you don't need to lose yourself in unbelievable speeches to have people cry over your death.

The book is just TOO much. VH: You know, about them being unbelievable when they talk? You seem to forget something. Augustus and Hazel ARE different.

They're unique, so they talk different. That's what it's all about. Me: They're not different, they don't exist. They can't exist. I don't think this was a good tribute to the kids who are really sick.

Because no one talks like that, NO ONE, and I feel like now there's this messed-up hierarchy between the sick kids who are sort of smart ass and those who aren't.

And I refuse that. I can't accept that. Being ironic, jaded, detached and all metaphorical over the disease is a luxury that genuinely sick teenagers cannot afford.

So fuck this. And I'd rather kneel before a kid who has cancer and who doesn't know what a metaphor is than shed a tear over one of Augustus's stupid monologues.

VH: You liar, I know you cried while you read the book. You were a sobbing mess. Me: I wasn't. I was a sobbing mess at the end of Before I Die.

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl had me in tears, too. These are all gorgeous books that deal with cancer. And I cried like a bitch every single time, and they broke my heart.

But this? I didn't cry. VH: You did, and you know it. Especially at THIS special moment. VH : You cried when Hazel asked her mom if she would still be a mom after her death.

Me: Fine, okay. I cried. I know. But look. That's precisely the point. That's what I call emotional blackmail.

Because it's a universal fear! Whether you're a mom, or a daughter, or both, if you have a sister even, you must have thought about that already and told yourself : Okay, if I die, or if she dies.

Who will I be? If my sister dies and I'm asked whether I have a sibling, what should I say? Am I still a sister because she existed, once?

Or if you have a child, and then one day your baby dies. What happens then? Are you still a parent? Are you still a parent because once, you used to be a parent, and because there's a room upstairs that used to be your child's?

I dare you to think about it and not end up crying. I took it as a betrayal from John Green because I feel like he didn't play fair. But it's so easy.

It doesn't require any talent. Just ask anyone to talk about that and they'll be tearing up in 5 seconds! Do you understand what I'm trying to say?

I feel like he was like, "I'm gonna make them cry. Writing like that, it's not incredible, it's not magical and it's not valuable.

It's playing with people's weaknesses. It's manipulating people into crying. And I can't respect him with that the way I respect people who manage to make me cry without using such poor plot devices.

There's a cancer book that really took me by surprise. Because, Rachel, the sick girl, is everything but admirable. She's young, a bit shallow, nice, shy, plain, normal, really.

And her neighbor who befriends her, he doesn't fall in love with her. And her death won't be remembered like something that scarred humanity, because it didn't.

Ultimately, it didn't even matter at all. And I could relate more easily to that, to the meaningless dimension of her death, to the emptiness of it all, more than I could ever relate to the ridiculous speeches of Augustus and Hazel's too, for that matter.

Because you know what bothered me, too? They're indistinct. VH: That's because they're soul mates. That's the whole point of the book.

They found themselves in each other. Me: It doesn't work to say they're soul mates. Look, I read the book almost a year ago, I think. It's also unrealistic that a teenager would ever say that, let alone improvize it, but whatever, it's pretty.

But the thing is, I am completely unable to say whether it's Augustus or Hazel who says that. I don't know. I have no idea.

Me: So yeah. I didn't love the book, and I am not in the business of denying myself the simple pleasure of saying true things; I didn't love the book, and I know this review might be just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we're all doomed to another John Green book about an unbelievable loser and his even more loser sidekick loving an unbelievable teenage girl, and that there will come a day when maybe he will change his writing formula, and maybe that'll come when the sun will swallow the only earth we'll ever have, but then it'll be too late, so who cares?

I didn't love this book. Me: Yes! View all comments. Shelves: contemporary , undeserved-hype , annoying-characters , books-i-would-love-to-burn , disappointing-books , pretentious-books-and-characters , rip-braincells , cringe-worthy , are-you-fucking-kidding-me , over-hyped.

If you think that your opinion is the only opinion that exists on earth and that no one should dislike your favourite book, then I would suggest you to avoid this review.

Just because you love a particular book that I hate doesn't make you a good person and me a bad person, It simply shows that people like different things.

Every reader has the freedom to dissect and critically analyse any book and write their thoughts on it in their own review space without the fear of anyone or fans bossing them into writing what the fandom wants.

Critically analysing books and criticising problematic aspects of any reading material prevents people from being passive readers. Shakespeare and J.

Your hate messages and death threats will show much more of your personality than your love for this book.

Also, your hate messages aren't going to put me down. Also, I've caught fans making fake accounts to troll my review, this shows me that they are big cowards who hide their faces and send me spiteful comments.

You can love whatever you want to and believe in whomever you want to. Do you find anyone who hated this book shoving their opinions in comments of positive reviews?

Then what makes you think that you have the rights to troll negative reviews? Alright, now let's begin with the review. Surprisingly, this book was so special that it became the first book that I slammed on the wall twice after reading it.

I'm surprised to find that harsh critics are swallowing up this trash and calling it a masterpiece. The characters- Hazel and Augustus are the flattest cardboard cut-outs I have ever seen in any book.

Both of them were like years-old stuck in some teenager's bodies making them very boring and unlikable. Hazel was such an annoying, stupid and pretentious Mary Sue that I wanted to punch her right in the face.

But a hot boy. These two characters meld together and have no depth at all. Romance- It fell from the sky.

The romance is undeveloped and it comes from nowhere. I was baffled when Hazel accepted to go to Augustus's house just minutes after meeting him.

How stupid can you be? You fall for a guy's words whom you met just few minutes ago and agree to go to his house! What if he were a murderer or rapist?

Not to mention that the kissing scene in Anne Frank's house was so effing disgusting. Anne Frank's house is considered to be a place of remembrance, a place where 2 families hid during the dark days of Holocaust.

If anyone makes out at such a revered site, they would be kicked out regardless of who or what they are. People present around will be disgusted, they won't stand and watch much less clap for the "lovely" couple.

Writing- Cheesy. Want to hear some favourite quotes of mine? Why compare your thoughts to stars and constellations?

I'm in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we're all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we'll ever have, and I am in love with you.

All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything.

There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught.

Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever.

And you know what? Teenagers living in the 21st century DON'T speak like that. No teen can spontaneously come up with long monologues within seconds.

One thing I don't buy is that teens with cancer suddenly become magically wise. They become terrified, confused, depressed and angry. This book made me roll my eyes in disgust.

Put me to sleep. I had to plough through the whole book. TFioS is nothing but a cheesy romance novel. Ok, so this book made you cry, right? I cried after reading Allegiant for days but I hated that book with burning passion, it was one of the worst books I ever read.

Before you start calling me a cold-hearted bitch for hating and criticising this book, let me tell you that if you think you have every right to go around fangirling how wonderful this book was then I believe that I have every right to express my hatred for it whether you like it or not.

It's hard to believe that anyone would talk like that in a normal conversation every single time. I am a teen and I go to high school, I know many other teens of my age who have developed a large vocabulary and have brilliant writing skills.

That is simply because they love reading and have developed the habit of learning new words from the dictionary from a very young age.

They write amazing poems and honestly, it takes them a lot of time to ponder over and make their metaphors or poems perfect.

They obviously cannot open their mouth and spontaneously say "My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations". Btw, none of the teenage characters from this book show any interest in reading high literature and poetry the only book Hazel claims to read is An Imperial Affliction then what's the reason behind their ability to spew pretentious monologues?

They aren't geniuses, they aren't teens who read avidly or analyse high literature and show interest in oratory, existentialist philosophy and poetry.

Therefore, it's not plausible for them to speak with profound words. I would believe their monologues had they shown interest in Kant, Sartre, Nietzsche and Heidegger.

Now going over the cigarette metaphor, Augustus buys a pack of cigarettes regularly just so he could put one in his mouth and not light it thus, giving us another stupid dialogue "It's a metaphor.

You keep the killing thing between your teeth but don't give it the power to kill you". Funny that he won't kill himself by lighting up the cigarette but will regularly give money to an industry that is the largest cause of cancer thus, promoting the cigarette industry and indirectly killing others.

What a genius! Not to mention that he mocks Hazel's cancer right on her face and guess her reaction?

She's impressed and readily approves of and participants in his metaphor. There's a lot of difference between being wise and being pretentious and Hazel and Augustus are the latter.

I don't buy their dialogues because they are extremely ridiculous and cheesy and no argument by fans and authors can change my opinion because Green makes no effort in making the dialogues IN THE BOOK seem plausible.

I've read Green's post on Augustus' character being pretentious and imo, he misses the point that his characters are not only pretentious; they are extremely unrealistic as well.

Augustus' pretension is not "an intentional flaw", it's simply poor characterisation. I'm not saying that kids with cancer cannot be intelligent.

A lot of fans say that the characters in the book are special and wise because they have cancer and this book tries hard to show that too.

I merely said that having cancer does not mean that you can automatically become wise and gain a lot of knowledge. I couldn't sympathise with the characters and feel their pain.

That doesn't mean that I'm cold hearted. It's not my fault that I couldn't get emotionally connected to the characters, it's the authors fault for not writing characters I could sympathise with.

It's the author's fault for making shallow, judgemental and annoying characters. It's the his fault for making characters with personality that mocks cancer patients and who show disrespect to millions of people who died in the Holocaust.

It's the author's fault for romanticising cancer and using it as a ploy to sell his book. I'm hating them for who they are.

I'm hating the book because it's poorly written. I don't need to have cancer to analyse this book. Having cancer does not mean that you get the rights to say whatever you want to about this book.

Every reader whether sick or not has equal rights to analyse and voice their opinions freely on any book. That Girl Hey, I think your review is a bit extreme.

Maybe there is truth in it, but it mostly feels like your trying to make the Little problems humongous. And Hey, I think your review is a bit extreme.

And it is a beautiful one. Also your standards are very high. I pity you. I pity people who cannot see the beautiful little things.

Dec 03, Richa rated it it was amazing. I HATE this book. Absolutely hate it. Not just from the bottom of my heart which would literally mean my ventricles, and so, no but with my whole heart.

I hate it, hate it, hate it. I hate the fact that it made me laugh, so hard! I hate the fact that it made me smile, so much! I hate the fact that it made me chuckle, so profusely!

I hate the fact that it gifted me with so much Laughter, Smiles and Chuckles when I was expecting to come face to face with tragedy at any moment I hate the fact that while Hazel Grace fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once , I just fell I hate the fact that I fell in love with this bound-to-end-in-oblivion, bound-to-end-in-disaster boy who stared with blue blue eyes and put the killing thing right between his teeth, but never gave it the power to do its killing.

Putting a cigarette right between your teeth and never lighting it, yes, that's Augustus Waters for you, people, a guy huge on metaphors and symbolism I hate the fact that when I least expected it, the story, the words just grabbed me and pulled me in so deep that even the thought of ever resurfacing never entered my mind.

I hate that the fact that right in the middle of my dance in the rain of laughter, dry wit, and humour without any warning, without any lightning as it's precedent, this thunder would stun me, startle me, wipe the smile right off my face, and sober me up, wake me up from the intoxication of the very real yet false jocularity spun by them , a humour which was nothing but human tragedy waiting-to-happen-and-had-already-happened in disguise and then push me back into that rain to dance again.

I hate the fact that I'm not making my much sense right now And yes, all the hate above is a metaphor, a symbolic word for love But right now I can't bring myself to say that I love this book So, even though her lungs suck at being lungs , she's still alive and well not kicking, but breathing, with difficulty because remember her lungs suck at being lungs , but breathing nonetheless.

She's been nothing but a terminal case ever since her diagnosis. The doctors are simply finding ways of keeping her alive rather than removing the cancer ridden lungs and replacing it with a new one, because let's face it, her chances of surviving such an operation are like next to nothing and why waste a good pair of lungs on a given, bound-to-fail body?

So, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. Enter Augustus Waters.

He's 17, gorgeous, in remission, and very frankly and much to her surprise interested in her. He's the unexpected, hot, gorgeous twist in her story Their story begins with a staring contest So she stares back Spoiler Alert: She wins.

And it progresses into something brilliant, something as bright as the stars, into Something with a capital S I hate this book.

This needs indefinite repetitions, I hate it. I hate the fact that I fell in love with their always. Sie bewundert seine lockere Art und den Umgang mit seiner Krebserkrankung.

Die beiden verbringen immer mehr Zeit miteinander und ihre Beziehung wird enger. Mit einer schweren Lungenentzündung landet Hazel im Krankenhaus.

Während ihrer Genesung wird sie mehrmals von Gus besucht, der ihr versichert, dass sie ihm viel mehr bedeute als jeder Schmerz, den sie ihm zufügen könnte.

Er will ihr ihren Herzenswunsch, nämlich Peter van Houten, den Autor ihres Lieblingsbuches, in Amsterdam zu besuchen, erfüllen; er hat bei einer Organisation, die krebskranken Kindern Herzenswünsche erfüllt eine Fantasieversion der realen Make-A-Wish-Foundation , noch einen Wunsch frei, den er nun für Hazel einsetzen möchte.

Das Treffen mit van Houten wird jedoch eine Enttäuschung, da dessen Sekretärin Lidewij Vliegenthart den Besuch ohne das Wissen ihres Arbeitgebers organisiert hat, der ein unfreundlicher, zynischer Alkoholiker geworden ist.

Er weigert sich, die Fragen der Jugendlichen zu beantworten, und verhält sich ihnen gegenüber beleidigend, woraufhin Lidewij kündigt und mit den enttäuschten Jugendlichen das Haus verlässt.

Zurück im Hotel schlafen sie miteinander. Hier kannst du sie vorschlagen! Bitte immer nur genau eine Deutsch-Englisch-Übersetzung eintragen Formatierung siehe Guidelines , möglichst mit einem guten Beleg im Kommentarfeld.

Wichtig: Bitte hilf auch bei der Prüfung anderer Übersetzungsvorschläge mit! Limited Input Mode - Mehr als ungeprüfte Übersetzungen! Du kannst trotzdem eine neue Übersetzung vorschlagen, wenn du dich einloggst und andere Vorschläge im Contribute-Bereich überprüfst.

Pro Review kannst du dort einen neuen Wörterbuch-Eintrag eingeben bis zu einem Limit von unverifizierten Einträgen pro Benutzer. Vielen Dank dafür!

Links auf dieses Wörterbuch oder einzelne Übersetzungen sind herzlich willkommen! Fragen und Antworten. Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter.

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch

The Fault In Our Stars Deutsch More TV Shows & Movies Video

DAS SCHICKSAL IST EIN MIESER VERRÄTER Trailer Deutsch German - 2014 [HD] It is the human condition to attempt to find hope in hopeless situations. Because this, unlike his earlier works, feels Kino Vreden and intentionally tearjerky and insincere. So a discussion occurred in my head after I rated David Walton book. This is pathetic. Her cancer began as thyroid cancer but spread to her lungs, causing her to need to breathe oxygen from a tank at Attack On Titan Staffel 3 Stream Deutsch times throughout the day. Netflix and third parties use cookies why? I'm not exactly sure Alien Covenant Imdb you mean here. Also, your hate messages aren't going to put me down. But I ended up really wanting to put the book down several times.

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1 Kommentar

  1. Zulkijar

    Es ist die lustige Phrase

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